Anemia

Definition:
Anemia is a deficiency in the number of red blood cells, hemoglobin or both.

Symptoms:
      The condition is marked by varying degrees of pallor and palpitation.

Causes
      When we have a good bloodstream we have a good, healthy life. It would be wise to take time to learn the principles of building good blood in the body. One of our teachers, Dr. Edward E. Shook at the Los Angeles Herbal Institute (closed at this writing), gives a fine explanation of the cause of anemia as follows:
      Carbon dioxide and other waste gases are re-absorbed into the life-giving oxygen. Everyone knows that two atoms of oxygen unite with one atom of carbon to form dioxide. But when there is insufficient oxygen, only one atom unites with carbon, to produce carbon-monoxide, and that is where most of our trouble begins--anemia, low blood pressure, or where there is an abundance of calcium, high blood pressure; because calcium thickens the blood. It requires a great deal more pressure to pump thick blood than it does to pump thin blood; and please make special note, that all this is brought about because there is not sufficient iron in the blood, to carry enough oxygen to the cells, to enable them to breathe, and throw off their waste products. New cells are not produced fast enough to replace the decaying and dead ones. Pus is formed only when cells decay. Therefore, it requires no great stretch of the imagination to see how vitally necessary it is to have enough iron in the blood stream to convey sufficient oxygen to all parts.
      Nearly every food we eat, or a large percentage of it, contains iron and oxygen. Wheat and most of the grains and cereals (in their whole state) contain iron in the form of iron phosphate, as do many vegetables, such as beets, turnips, tomatoes, spinach, lettuce, cabbage, celery, carrots, squash, parsley, mustard greens, dandelion leaves, watercress, etc., but our principal source of organic iron and oxygen is the fruit. The apple is loaded with these two elements, particularly the winesap. All berries, plums, prunes, grapes, raisins, dates, figs, cherries, etc., contain organic iron in abundance, and the citrus fruits, such as oranges, lemons, limes, etc., are principally composed of citric acid, which is one third oxygen.

Essential:
      Green 15






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